Ocean Rider, Inc. is a Hawaiian-based seahorse aquarium that follows strict organic, "good farming" practices in raising seahorses and other aquatic life. Get Started Today!

Visit us on Facebook  Follow Us on Twitter  Seahorse Photos on Instagram  See our channel on YouTube  FREE eNewsletter Signup!!!

You are here

Aquarium Density

Q. What is the optimum sticking density for a 30 gallon tank?

If you are considering Mustangs and Sunbursts (Hippocampus erectus), which are the seahorses I would recommend for a new seahorse keeper, I would suggest a stocking density of 1 pair per 10 gallons (~40 liters).  So your 30 gallon tank can house up to 3 pair or a total of 6 full grown H. erectus.

Commonly known as Lined Seahorse or Northern Giant, Hippocampus erectus was the first seahorse to be commercially raised for the aquarium hobby. They have been captive-bred and raised for more generations than any other seahorse, and have now achieved a level of domestication that makes them better adapted to aquarium conditions and life in captivity than other seahorses. The aquaculture facility in Hawaii that raises H. erectus selects them for traits such as adaptability, vigor, disease resistance, fast growth and aggressive feeding habits -- traits that increase the fitness of each line over time (Abbott 2003). After numerous generations of strengthening and improvement, the current breeds of farm-raised erectus are tough as nails. Very hardy and very impressive, yet affordable, CB Mustangs are a great choice for a novice seahorse keeper who is still learning the ropes (Abbott 2003). They are very adaptable and have led the ongoing trend toward keeping captive-bred seahorses only (Abbott 2003). As Alisa Abbott reports, more than any other specimens, captive-bred-and-raised erectus are responsible for the ever-growing popularity of cultured seahorses (Abbott 2003). Simply put, more hobbyists keep CB erectus than any of the other greater seahorses, and rightly so.

These are impressive animals. They are large, robust, deep-chested seahorses that can reach well in excess of 7 inches in length when fully grown. They tend to be cryptically colored, and often show earth tones such as beige, russet, charcoal black, gray, brown, ochre or olive over an underlying pattern of fine parallel lines that run down their necks and across their chest (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). White blazes, blotches, saddles, triangles, and diamonds are common markings for captive-bred erectus (Giwojna, Jun. 2002).

The lighter specimens that show their stripes boldly can be very striking, and they are apt to express a wide range of color phases as time passes, including everything from yellow to yellow-green, green, lavender, purple, maroon, magenta, pink, red, and orange from time to time (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). Like all seahorses, the coloration expressed by Lined seahorses can vary with their mood, environment, and social activities.

The first pair of captive-bred seahorses I ever owned were Mustangs, and my 'stangs quickly learned to recognize me as their feeder, whereupon they would often interact with me at dinnertime by turning on their greeting colors. My original pair are still going strong several years later, and I have watched them go through a number of color phases from month to month. One has settled on gray-green as its base coloration for the moment, and the other ranges between rust, burnt umber, and orange, but always with contrasting beige bands (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). Last season, the male adopted a rich ochre yellow as his everyday attire (still with the same beige bands, though), while the female displayed a dark purplish ensemble with definite greenish highlights. When courting, they consistently brighten to a pearly white and a creamy yellow respectively (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). They make a handsome couple, and I find my erectus to be very attractive specimens in all their guises.

I set up my pair of these spirited steeds in a brand-new 30 gallon (tall) aquarium all their own, and that tank has been my most entertaining, trouble-free exhibit ever since.

In short, I would recommend you try a pair of Mustangs as your first seahorses. After you.ve gained a little experience with your Mustangs, I suggest adding a pair of Sunbursts to your herd next. Sunbursts are very similar to Mustangs in most respects, including their hardiness, and will even interbreed with them freely; the main difference is that the Sunbursts tend to be even more brightly colored, as their name implies. They are predisposed to display sunset colors (shades of yellow, gold, and orange) when conditions are to their liking. But you really can't go too far wrong when selecting your first specimens as long as you stick with captive-bred-and-raised seahorses and avoid wild-caught specimens.
 

Tags - FAQs: 
TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence

TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence

 

© Copyright 2017. All Rights Reserved - Ocean Rider Inc. Kailua Kona, Hawaii
Design & Development: Gatman Inc.