Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

are seahorses for me

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
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  • #1737
    ktm4us6
    Member

    Hi, im new to this site and was wondering if sea horses would be good for me. I had salt water reef tank about 5 years ago, and recently purchased a 265 gallon tank that was thinking of putting seahorses in. I would like to know from others how hard it is to take care of them. Im thinking of getting Mustangs – Hippocampus erectuske what do you think.

    #4941
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear hobbyist:

    Well, as an experienced marine aquarist and reef keeper, you certainly have the right background to provide good conditions for seahorses, and maintaining good water quality is half the battle. The highly domesticated Mustangs (Hippocampus erectus) are extremely well adapted for aquarium conditions and would be an excellent choice for your first seahorses, and a 265-gallon aquarium has tremendous water volume, which means that it can provide a very stable environment as well as a very comfortable margin for error, and the tank of that size will also have the superior height that is so important for seahorses. You would need to target feed the seahorses in an aquarium of that size but that can be an advantage in itself, as we will discuss later in this post, so offhand I can think of no compelling reason why you should not give captive-bred-and-raised seahorses a try…

    In terms of water quality, aquarium maintenance, and most other aspects of their care and keeping seahorses are no more demanding to keep than the average marine fish. In those respects, caring for a seahorse tank is the same as caring for any other marine aquarium.

    However, seahorses can be more demanding to keep than other aquarium fish when it comes to their feeding habits. You cannot simply sprinkle a little flake food or drop a little pellet food in the tank once or twice a day at feeding time. All Ocean Rider seahorses are trained to eat frozen Mysis as their staple, everyday diet from an early age, so providing them with suitable food is not a challenge whatsoever. But the worst thing you can do is to scatter a handful of frozen Mysis throughout the tank to be dispersed by the currents and hope that the hungry horses can track it all down. Inevitably some of the frozen food will be swept away and lodge in isolated nooks and crannies where the seahorses cannot get it. There it will begin to decompose and impair your water quality, which is why ammonia spikes are common after a heavy feeding. Or it may be wafted out into the open again later on and eaten after it has gone bad. Either outcome can lead to dire problems. Target feeding the seahorses or training them to use a feeding station are the best ways to avoid such complications, and it does take a little time each day to target feed your seahorses or to train them to use a feeding station initially.

    On the plus side, taking a little time to target feed the seahorses or teach them to use a feeding station can be very rewarding for the seahorse keeper and allows the seahorses to become real pets in every sense of the word. Seahorses are one fish that can become a true pet, and I’m convinced this is because they are more intelligent than most fishes. The highly domesticated Mustangs and Sunbursts are real personality fish and many of them actually enjoy being handled (handfeeding is my favorite method for target feeding seahorses). Unlike most other fish that back off when you approach the aquarium and flee in terror if you place your hand in the tank, seahorses soon learn to recognize their keeper and will come out to meet you. They quickly learn to take food from your fingers, and as you will discover, having your pet ponies literally eating out your hand is a very rewarding experience. When one of these shy, enchanting creatures — whose very survival in the wild depends on concealing itself from predators at all times — comes trustingly up to the surface to eat right out of your palm, it’s a thrill you won’t soon forget. The training sessions and daily feedings required for this tend to forge a close, personal relationship between the aquarist and his charges, and hand-fed seahorses often become special pets. Many times they will even include you in their daily greeting, flashing their recognition colors and parading back and forth and at the front of the tank, performing their dancelike displays for your benefit.

    The first pair of captive-bred seahorses I ever owned were Mustangs, and my ‘stangs quickly learned to recognize me as their feeder, whereupon they would often interact with me at dinnertime by turning on their greeting colors. My original pair are still going strong several years later, and I have watched them go through a number of color phases from month to month. One has settled on gray-green as its base coloration for the moment, and the other ranges between rust, burnt umber, and orange, but always with contrasting beige bands (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). Last season, the male adopted a rich ochre yellow as his everyday attire (still with the same beige bands, though), while the female displayed a dark purplish ensemble with definite greenish highlights. When courting, they consistently brighten to a pearly white and a creamy yellow respectively (Giwojna, Jun. 2002). They make a handsome couple, and I find my erectus to be very attractive specimens in all their guises.

    I set up my pair of these spirited steeds in a brand-new 30 gallon (tall) aquarium all their own, and that tank has been my most entertaining, trouble-free exhibit ever since. With a simple setup like theirs, I prefer to target feed my seahorses. That allows me to observe them closely on a daily basis, monitor their health, keep track of exactly how much each specimen is eating, and remove any leftovers immediately.

    Led by the female-by far the bolder and most outgoing of the two-the Mustangs were soon literally eating right out of my hands. (I know, I know-sensible aquarists should always strive to keep their mitts out the aquarium as much as possible, but handfeeding is a thrill I find difficult to resist, and hey — nobody ever said I was sensible!) Of course, I’m very well aware of the risks involved and extremely diligent about taking all the necessary precautions beforehand. And besides, there are major advantages to handfeeding that more than offset any minor risks.

    For one thing, the seahorses seem to enjoy the experience every bit as much as I do. They head for the feeding station as soon as I approach the tank, a series of color changes betraying their excitement, and queue up at the dinner table looking their best and brightest. Of course, they both try to snap up the first morsel – even pair-bonded ponies are not big on sharing or waiting turns – so I no longer offer them one mysid at a time. I offer them a handful of individually thawed Mysis in my upturned palm instead. They know the drill and happily perch on my fingers while snicking up the shrimp as fast as they can.

    Secondly, feeding your seahorses by hand permits the aquarist to conduct a close-up, daily inspection of every specimen in his tank, and I like to use the opportunity to give ’em a good once over. These detailed examinations make it difficult not to notice any subtle changes in my seahorse’s appearance or behavior that might signal impending problems with disease or the water chemistry. That’s a big advantage, since the sooner such potential problems are detected, the easier they are to cure or prevent, and I recommend other hobbyists do
    the same.

    So take a moment to enjoy the show when feeding your seahorses. Make sure they’re all eating well, and use this opportunity to look them over closely for wounds, injuries, or signs of disease. Seahorses are natural-born gluttons. Ordinarily, these galloping gourmets are ALWAYS hungry, so when a seahorse is off its feed, that’s often an excellent early indicator that something’s amiss in the aquarium.. Early detection of a potential problem can be the key to curing it, so it’s a good idea for the alert aquarist to observe his prize ponies while they put on the ol’ feed bag. Make sure they all show up for mess call, are acting normally, and have a well-rounded abdomen when they’re done eating. Handfeeding makes it hard to miss when one these chow hounds is off its feed, tipping off the alert aquarist to a potential problem.

    Best of all, handfeeding is pure, sure-fire, 100% unadulterated fish-keeping fun! Feeding time for my seahorses is always a high point in my day. Having your pet ponies literally eating out your hand is a very rewarding experience. These daily feedings tends to forge a close, personal relationship between the aquarist and his charges, and hand-fed seahorses often become special pets.

    As much as feeding time brightens up my day, I have no doubt it livens things up for my seahorses even more. They genuinely appear to enjoy interacting with me, and I believe in enriching their captive environment as much as possible. No doubt it’s the food they’re looking forward to, not the food giver, but our daily encounters are always eagerly awaited and they like to linger on my hand long after all the food is gone. They would allow me to lift them out of the water when I withdraw my hand if I didn’t gently shoo them away first.

    In short, you should expect to spend a little more time feeding your seahorses on a daily basis than most other tropical fish, but that can have its own advantages as well, and feeding my seahorses is always one of the highlights of my day.

    All things considered, the best way for you to get an excellent grasp of exactly what’s involved in the care and keeping of seahorses would be to complete the Ocean Rider training program for new seahorse keepers. Once you have completed all of the lessons, you will certainly have a much better idea if seahorses are for you or not.

    Please allow me to introduce myself: My name is Pete Giwojna and I provide tech-support for Ocean Rider (seahorse.com). Part of my duties in that regard include providing a quick training course for new Ocean Rider customers and first-time buyers to get them up to speed on the aquarium care and requirements of seahorses. All newbies are required to complete this basic training to my satisfaction before they can be certified and authorized to purchase Ocean Rider seahorses.

    The purpose of this training is twofold: (1) to assure that the hobbyist has a suitable aquarium, completely cycled and with the biofiltration fully established, ready and waiting when his seahorses arrive, and (2) to assure that the hobbyist has a good understanding of the aquarium care and requirements of Ocean Rider seahorses by the time he or she has completed the training and been certified. All of which will help to ensure that things go smoothly and that your first experience with Ocean Rider seahorses is rewarding and enjoyable.

    This basic training is very informal and completely free of charge. Ocean Rider provides the free training as a service to their customers and any other hobbyists who are interested in learning more about the care and keeping of seahorses. It’s a crash course on seahorse keeping consisting of 10 separate lessons covering the following subjects, and is conducted entirely via e-mail. All totaled, the lessons comprise over 180 pages of text with more than 100 full-color illustrations. There is no homework or examinations or anything of that nature — just a lot of good, solid information on seahorses for you to read through and absorb as best you can, at your own speed:

    Aquarium care and requirements of seahorses;
    Selecting a suitable aquarium for seahorses;
    size (tank height and water volume)
    filtration
    aquarium test kits
    Optimizing your aquarium for seahorses;
    lighting
    water movement and circulation
    hitching posts (real and artificial)
    aquascaping
    substrate
    Cycling a new marine aquarium;
    The cleanup crew (aquarium janitors & sanitation engineers);
    Water Chemistry
    optimal parameters
    water quality & water changes
    aquarium maintenance schedule
    Feeding seahorses;
    Compatible tank mates for seahorses;
    Courtship and breeding;
    Rearing the young;
    Disease prevention and control;
    Hippocampus erectus
    natural history
    professional rearing protocols
    Acclimating Ocean Rider seahorses.

    I will be providing you with detailed information on these subjects and answering any questions you may have about the material I present. I will also be recommending seahorse-related articles for you to read and absorb online.

    In short, the training course will teach you everything you need to know to keep your seahorses happy and healthy, and it will arm you with the information you need in order to tackle your first ponies with confidence. By the time you have completed all 10 lessons, you should know whether or not you would like to proceed and set up a tank of seahorses.

    If you would like to give the free training course of try, just send me a brief e-mail off list ([email protected]) with your first and last name and I will send you the first lesson immediately.

    Best wishes with all your fishes!

    Respectfully,
    Pete Giwojna

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