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Seahorse Training Program — get certified now!

Ocean Rider Seahorse Farm and Tours | Kona Hawaii Forums Seahorse Life and Care Seahorse Training Program — get certified now!

Viewing 7 posts - 226 through 232 (of 232 total)
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  • #52734
    txcherakee1
    Participant

    Hi.I am excited and looking forward to taking your seahorse certification class! I kept a pair or 2 in a cube tank on my desk at a special education Co op way back in about 1998/1999 somewhere in there. The kids and I truly enjoyed watching them very much. I have not had a tank set up in almost 2 decades now. I recently purchased a used 100 gallon acrylic tank which came with a refugium, a canister filter I think,and a stand with a makeshift hood and I believe some led lighting. I haven’t even decided where it is that I want to place the tank yet. So I am open to all suggestions and advice! I can send you a pic of the set up when I get back over to my house probably tomorrow sometime. Thank you, Lesli Ann Maddox DuBois 🐠🐬🐚🐡

    #52738
    Pete Giwojna
    Moderator

    Dear Lesli:

    Sure, I would be very happy to send you the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Manual so that you can earn your certification, and it discusses some of the things to keep in mind when choosing the location for your aquarium, so you’ll find it helpful in that regard as well.

    However, the seahorse training is a correspondence course that is conducted entirely via e-mail, Lesli, so I will need you to contact me out the following e-mail address, and we can go from there:

    [email protected]

    That will work well if you want to send me a photo of your new aquarium since you can simply attach it to the e-mail or insert it in the body of the e-mail, and I will be able to see it and even enlarge the photo, if necessary.

    In the meantime, best of luck with all of your projects, Lesli!

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Tech Support

    #52746
    Kelley Southern
    Participant

    Hi Pete! I am an experienced Marine aquarist and I currently have two tanks up and running, one that is a reef tank with fish and then another that I have set up in preparation for my seahorses. My reef tank contains a variety of live rock, corals, fish, and invertebrates. The tank I have set up in preparation for my seahorses contains a mandarin goby, a yellow watchman goby, 3 baby pajama cardinals, some soft leather coral, blue leg reef hermits, an assortment of small snails, and branching tonga rock (put in dry so no unwanted pests!) I actually ordered my seahorses yesterday, nit gaving seen the forum here. I have placed a supply of Picene Energetics mysis shrimp in the freezer. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Best wishes,
    Kelley

    #52748
    Pete Giwojna
    Moderator

    Dear Kelley:

    Congratulations on the new Ocean Rider seahorses that will soon be coming your way!

    All of the current residents of your seahorse tank are fish that normally do very well with seahorses so I don’t foresee any problems in that regard. As an experienced marine aquarist and reef keeper, I have no doubt that our hardy, highly domesticated, eminently adaptable seahorses will thrive under your diligent, conscientious care, Kelley.

    Just remember NOT to use drip acclimation or any other prolonged acclimation process when you introduce your new ponies to your aquarium. Following long-distance shipping all the way from Hawaii to the mainland, it’s important to use an abbreviated acclimation procedure that gets the ponies into their destination tank within 20 minutes (30 minutes of the variables) after you open the shipping bags, Kelley, for reasons we will go into a more detail after we establish e-mail contact.

    Of course, I would be very happy to send you the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Manual so that you can make sure that you are providing your new ponies with the best possible care.

    However, the seahorse training is a correspondence course that is conducted entirely via e-mail, Kelley, so I will need you to contact me out the following e-mail address as soon as you can, and we can proceed from there:

    [email protected]

    In the meantime, best of luck with all of your projects, Kelley!

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Tech Support

    #52769
    sllyoliver
    Participant

    Hi
    I have a 600ltr reef tank and a 300ltr tank I have just changed from reef to seahorse. This week they had a bacterial infection and I lost 3 ponies, I am heartbroken. the remaining ones are in a holding tank, I have totally emptied my 300ltr, scrubbed it out and the sump, refilled with 100ltrs from my other reef tank and 200ltrs nsw. I have added live rock and will cycle for a week before putting the ponies back in with a sand free base, little live rock and some plastic hitching posts. I am determined they will not get ill again, I feel so guilty they passed away because I didn’t know how to care for them properly. the only exotic vet I could find was on holiday all week, I think if I had access to antibiotics they may have got better, so I have now registered with an exotic vet and have ordered furon 2 from America and managed to get hold of some iodine, which took a week to arrive. I really want to learn all about these amazing creatures and cant wait to start!

    #52773
    Pete Giwojna
    Moderator

    Dear sllyoliver:

    I’m very sorry to hear about the infection that has killed some of your seahorses and puts the rest of your ponies at risk, sir. All my condolences on your losses!

    It is unfortunate that you do not have appropriate medications on hand so that you can address this problem in its early stages, when such infections are easier to deal with, but many home hobbyists have good results using nitrofuran antibiotics such as Furan 2, so that it’s a good antibiotic for you to have obtained.

    A typical treatment regimen for nitrofuran antibiotics such as Furan2 is 10 days, and even when you’re dealing with the problem that you know normally respond well to nitrofuran antibiotics, it’s not unusual for more than one regimen of the medication to be required to completely resolve the issue. What many people don’t understand is that antibiotic therapy does not cure an infection by killing off or eliminating ALL of the pathogenic bacteria from the fish’s system; rather, the antibiotics merely inhibit the growth of the harmful bacteria and slow down their rate of reproduction, allowing the patient’s overwhelmed immune system to finally gain control of the situation and eventually eliminate the pathogens in that way.

    For example, this is what “Use of Antibiotics Ornamental Fish Aquaculture” says in that regard: “Antibiotics are very useful additions to any fish-health managers toolbox, but they are only tools and not ‘magic bullets.’ The ability of antibiotics to help eliminate a fish disease depends on a number of factors: 1) Does the problem actually have a bacterial component? 2) Are the bacteria involved sensitive to the antibiotic chosen? 3) Are the proper dosage and treatment intervals being used? 4) Have other contributing stresses been removed or reduced?

    Antibiotics, in and of themselves, do not cure the fish. Antibiotics merely control the population of bacteria in a fish long enough for its immune system to eliminate them.
    Before antibiotics are even considered, sources of stress such as poor water quality (including drastic temperature change), nutrition, genetics, and handling or transport must be removed or reduced. Affected fish should also be examined for parasites. Any of these factors may be the primary cause of disease, as bacterial infections are often secondary to such management problems. Contacting a fish health specialist early in the disease outbreak will help identify contributing stresses and the rate of bacterial infection so total losses of fish will be reduced. ”

    So a good outcome depends on how strong the patient’s immune system is every bit as much as it depends on using the proper medication to begin with, and it’s challenging to try to predict when you’ll see improvement even under the best of circumstances.

    Having explained that, Furan2 has proven to be useful in treating non-ulcerative infections in seahorses in many cases.

    Furan 2 can be administered either as a bath by adding the medication directly to the treatment tank or it can be administered orally via gut-loaded brine shrimp.

    Here’s how to proceed when adding it directly to the treatment tank (courtesy of Ann at the org):

    FURAN-BASED MEDS (immersion) Dosage and Preparation Instructions for a 10g/38L Hospital Tank
    Active Ingredients: Nitrofurazone and Furazolidone
    Indication: bacterial infection
    Brand Names: Furan-2, Furanase, Binox, BiFuran+, Fura-MS, Furazolidone Powder
    Dose daily for 10 days. Disregard package info concerning dosing frequency and water changes.
    Replace the medication in ratio to the amount of water changed daily as needed to control ammonia.
    This product is best administered by feeding it to adult live brine shrimp, then in turn, feeding those animals to the affected seahorse. If this is not an option, it may be administered as follows:

    DAY 1 of Treatment
    • Thoroughly mix the medication with about 1 cup of marine water.
    • Pour the mixture into a high-flow area of the hospital tank.
    DAYS 2 – 10 of Treatment
    • Perform a 50% water change.
    • Thoroughly mix the medication with about 1 cup of marine water.
    • Pour the mixture into a high-flow area of the hospital tank.

    Many times Furan 2 is most effective when administered orally via adult brine shrimp that have been gut loaded with the medication, as explained below:

    FURAN-BASED MEDS (oral) Dosage and Preparation Instructions for administering Furan 2 orally.

    Active Ingredients: Nitrofurazone and/or Furazolidone
    Indication: bacterial infection
    Brand Names: Furan-2, Furanase, Binox, BiFuran+, FuraMS, Furazolidone Powder
    Feed adult brine shrimp gut-loaded with medication to the Seahorse 2x per day for 10 days.
    • Add a small amount of the medication to one gallon of water and mix thoroughly.
    • Place the amount of adult brine shrimp needed for one feeding into the mixture. Leave them in the mixture for at least 2hrs.
    • Remove the adult brine shrimp from the mixture and add them to the hospital tank.
    • Observe the Seahorse to be certain it is eating the adult brine shrimp.

    In my experience, the best way to gutload the adult brine shrimp is to set up a clean plastic pail with 1 gallon of freshly mixed saltwater, add one packet of the Furan 2, add enough live adult brine shrimp for a generous feeding for all of your seahorses to the bucket after you have thoroughly and carefully rinsed them in freshwater to disinfect the shrimp. Leave the adult brine shrimp in the medicated bucket for at least two hours and then feed them directly to the seahorses. Repeat this procedure twice a day for 10 days.

    The Ocean Rider seahorse training program is a correspondence course that is conducted entirely via e-mail, sllyoliver, so if you want to participate I will need you to contact me off list at the following e-mail address:

    [email protected]

    In the meantime, best of luck resolving the infection that is plaguing your seahorses, sllyoliver.

    Respectfully,
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Tech Support

    #52783
    sllyoliver
    Participant

    Thank you so much for your very detailed and informative reply. the ponies i have left are all doing well and the display tank has been thoroughly cleaned, refilled and is now cycling to be ready for them, i cant wait to begin the course and will email you directly x

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