Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Club
Aquarium & Livestock

Feed Ezy Frozen Mysis

Seahorse Training Program — get certified now!

Ocean Rider Seahorse Farm and Tours | Kona Hawaii Forums Seahorse Life and Care Seahorse Training Program — get certified now!

Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 274 total)
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  • #5643
    Joanie
    Guest

    Hi Pete,

    I am very interested in your seahorse instruction.

    I started with a 29 gallon nano tank and had pretty good results so then we had a tank made for us with the dimensions being 36 wide, 18 deep and 30 tall. I have kept seahorses on and off for 5 years and have enjoyed it but am exhausted with all the different advice I hear. I have been told that I can keep up to 20 seahorses in this tank but others have said between 6 and 8. 

    We have a protein skimmer and a reactor with Xport NO3 remover from Brightwell. We also have faux corals and faux plants from living colors to be used as hitching posts.

    We have several other tanks with coral and fish, but I get great joy from the sea horses.

    Would enjoy knowing as much as possible to keep the sea horses happy and healthy.

    Thank you,

    Joanie

     

     

    #5644
    Joanie
    Guest

    Missed the email address: [email protected]

     

    Thanks

    Joanie Ryan

    #5656
    PatS
    Guest

    hey Pete, I would like to find out about your certification classes….Thanks

    #5657
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear Pat:

    Okay, I received your e-mail message regarding your interest in the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Program, Pat, and I have sent you all of the pertinent information explaining exactly how the training course works.

    In fact, you should have received your copy of the training manual by this time, Pat, and I am sure you are already well into the first lesson.

    As you know, the first step for anyone who is interested in participating in the seahorse training and receiving their certification is to contact me via e-mail, with a little information about their background and experience as aquarists, if any, so that we can begin the correspondence course as soon as possible. Interested parties can always reach me at the following e-mail address:

    [email protected]

    best of luck with the lessons, Pat! Be sure to let me know when you have any questions or concerns about any of the material in the training program.

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Tech Support

    #5675
    DonS
    Guest

    Peter,

    Is the Training Program still active? I sent a request to your e-mail with some background last week.

    Thanks,

    Don

    #5676
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear Don:

    Yes, sir – the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Program is always active and always available for Ocean Rider clients and customers.

    In fact, newbies and first-time buyers are required to complete the training satisfactorily before they will be allowed to purchase seahorses.

    I have enrolled several new trainees both last week and this week, Don, but I have no record of a request by yourself, sir, and I went through my spam folder to see if your message had been inadvertently directed to my junk mail, but I found nothing to that effect…

    Please go ahead and resend your background information to the following e-mail address, Don, and I will get you signed up right away:

    [email protected]

    Best wishes with all your fishes!

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Training Program Advisor

    #5677
    Trishron
    Guest

    Hi Pete

    My name is Patricia Heather  I have been doing Saltwater for 12 years now i currently have a 400 gallon up and running and also I have a 120 Gallon tank for my seahorses at the moment I have a seperate sump tank I have a skimmer and uv lamp and lights of course   I just started this hobby with the seahorses but at present I have 2 seahorses and i have also had 3 births from the father so far i have managed to save 6 from my last batch and they seem to be doing really really well the first 2 batches i took out of the parent tank and they didnt do well lost them all actually but this one i left with the parents and they seem to be thriving I really want to be able to know everything i need to know and how to take care of the babies at present I feed the babies every three hours but when do you cut back when do you start giving frozen mysis also the babies are eating frozen baby brine and doing very well on it So I am very eager and interested in your course Please sign me up Thanks

    #5679
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear Patricia:

    Wow – that’s amazing that the third brood of young has been doing so well in the 120-gallon main tank with their parents, Patricia! I would have thought it would be virtually impossible to maintain a good feeding density of baby brine shrimp or other suitable foods for the babies in such a large volume of water. And it’s equally remarkable to have the seahorse fry accepting frozen baby brine shrimp at such an early age. Well done!

    As a general rule of thumb, Patricia, once the new juveniles reach 1-1/2 inches in length, they need a more substantial diet than newly hatched brine shrimp (or frozen baby brine shrimp), and they are ready to be weaned onto frozen foods. They should be receiving brine shrimp at advanced instars, including adult brine shrimp, at this size, and you should begin weaning them onto minced frozen Mysis and other frozen foods once they have grown to about 1-1/2 inches in length, as discussed below.

    Making the Transition to Frozen Foods

    The current thinking is that the fry can remain on a steady diet of newly hatched Artemia until you are ready to begin weaning them onto a diet of frozen foods (usually minced Mysids and/or Cyclop-eeze). Aquaculturists are now converting the fry to frozen foods earlier than ever, often beginning around 3-4 weeks old. Jeff Mitchell reports that the fry are healthier and grow faster the sooner they make the transition to enriched frozen foods, and he expects the young seahorses to have made the transition to frozen foods by the age of 4-1/2 weeks.

    I generally have the best results using frozen Mysis. The best way to prepare the Mysis for the juvenile seahorses is to mince the frozen Mysis coarsely rather than putting it through a blender or any such thing. How fine or coarse you need to chop it depends on the size of your fry, since you want to wind up with bite-size pieces of Mysis. Initially, many breeders prefer to shave small pieces of Mysis off of a cube while it’s still frozen.

    The frozen Mysis that works best for most hobbyists is Hikari in frozen blocks rather than trays. The Hikari Mysis is much smaller than Piscine Energetics Mysis relicta and that makes it easier to shave off bite-sized pieces for the young seahorses. Some hobbyists report even better results using the new Mini Mysis offered by H2O Life, which is small enough that it often doesn’t need to be minced or shaved before offering it to the juveniles.

    When it comes to shaving the Mysis, a technique that works well for many home hobbyists is to use a potato peeler to shave off bits of the Hikari Mysis from a frozen block, and then use a single edged razor blade to further mince the frozen bits the potato peeler has removed.

    Try offering the minced Mysis exclusively for their first feeding of the day when the youngsters are the hungriest. Watch the juveniles closely to see if any of them begin to pick at the minced Mysis or pick it up from the bottom. If they still aren’t having any of it, siphon up the uneaten frozen Mysis after about half an hour and offer them newly hatched brine shrimp soaked in Mysis juice so that they have something to eat, and intermingle some freshly minced Hikari frozen Mysis or Cyclop-eeze in with the bbs.

    When the fry have grown a little larger and can accommodate bigger pieces of Mysis, I find it convenient to carefully thaw whole Mysis individually and then carefully chop them into several pieces. Or the Mini Mysis by H2O Life can be fed to the larger juveniles whole and intact, if you can obtain it.

    Either way, it is very important to be extra diligent about vacuuming up leftovers (and any fecal pellets) while the fry are making the transition to frozen Mysis. Otherwise, the minced Mysis that doesn’t get eaten right away while it’s still suspended in the water column or shortly after it has settled on the bottom will begin to degrade the water quality in your nursery tank.

    It’s important to overlap the fry food when they are making the transition. Offer them shaved or minced Mysis along with the newly hatched brine shrimp they are accustomed to eating. (Many times it’s better to offer the minced Mysis first, while the fry is still the hungriest, and then add the baby brine shrimp.) Once they begin eating the bits of frozen Mysis well, gradually increase the amount of minced Mysis and decreased the amount of baby brine shrimp you offer at every feeding until they are finally eating the shaved Mysis almost entirely.

    Overlapping the feedings this way, offering newly-hatched brine shrimp as usual along with just a little frozen Mysis at first, assures that there is familiar food available to the fry while they are making the transition and makes sure that the slow learners still get enough to eat.

    Some hobbyists find it helpful to begin soaking the newly hatched brine shrimp in Mysis juice for a week or two before they actually began offering the bits of minced Mysis along with the bbs. That way, the juveniles get used to the scent of the frozen Mysis and associate it with food before you start to add the bits of frozen Mysis.

    Here’s a previous message from Patti that describes how she weaned her erectus fry onto frozen to Hikari Mysis:

    [open quote]
    I’m wondering if nutrition is your problem.
    Could you train them onto frozen mysis? My 4 week old erectus are eating shaved Hikari frozen mysis already. They started not eating much of the BBS and looking around the bottom of the bowl. I enriched the shaved mysis w/Vibrance & put it in the bowl. It goes to the bottom and they’re on the hunt. They’ll look at it a good while and then snick. It only took 1 day to train them. I swish it around a little at first to get them interested.

    I think the mysis is better for them nutritionally and they don’t have to spend so much energy eating all those tiny BBS. Give it a try. It may take a few days. I gave mine the mysis 1st – before adding the BBS. That way they were pretty hungry. Then I gave them some BBS for desert to make sure each one got something to eat if they weren’t eating enough mysis yet.
    Patti [close quote]

    Notice that Patti’s erectus fry were all hitching and beginning to look around on the bottom for things to eat, indicating that they were ready to give up their planktonic existence (i.e., the high-risk pelagic phase) and make the transition from live brine shrimp suspended in the water column to frozen foods.

    Other breeders go a step further and begin adding a little of the minced Mysis to their nursery tanks with the newborns right from the start to help build up their intestinal flora and ultimately enable them to better digest the frozen Mysis when they start eating it. They feel that this helps the babies get them used to the scent of the Mysis and conditions them to associate it with food, which helps to make the transition from live food to frozen Mysis easier later on when they’re the right age.

    For example, here’s how Neil Garrick-Maidment, a very successful breeder in the UK, describes this technique:

    Hi Peter and all,

    I tend to put in a very small amount of finely chopped mysis in with the fry from day 1. The idea behind this is to create a bacterial soup in the fry water to help load the fry gut with the right bacteria to break up the mysis shrimp which tends to be quite hard. It makes it easier to get them to switch to dead mysis later on BUT it is crucial to clean the tank daily and water change to stop a problem with disease..

    Neil Garrick-Maidment

    Cyclop-eeze is also worth considering when weaning the youngsters onto frozen fare. When the juveniles are the right age, don’t hesitate to try them on frozen Cyclop-eeze first if you aren’t having any luck with the frozen Mysis. Lelia Taylor is one hobbyist who has had good results using the Cyclop-eeze, as she described below:

    I have had success placing BBS in Cyclop-eeze, then feeding the mixture to my babies. They readily take the Cyclop-eeze. As they get bigger I add frozen, enriched brine shrimp. they began eating the frozen food immediately. Using the same principle, I began adding Mysid shrimp, along with the brine shrimp and Cyclop-eeze. I have found, even very young babies, will pick the larger pieces of Mysid shrimp, into bite sized pieces. I have also had success culturing copepods in my baby and grow up tanks. The babies readily feed on these, as well.

    Hobbyists who have tried The Cyclop-eeze for their juveniles are unanimous in saying that the frozen Cyclop-eeze is far superior than the freeze dried product for this purpose. They report that the bars of frozen Cyclop-eeze in particular work well because they will shed copious amounts of the bite-size frozen cyclops into the water.

    Bonus tip: adding one or two older juveniles that are already eating the frozen Mysis well to the nursery tank along with the inexperienced fry in order to act as their mentors can hasten the transition. Many hobbyists report that fry learn to take frozen minced mysids much faster and easier when they are provided with teachers to show them the way. These teachers are usually a few of the older fry from a previous brood, which have already become proficient at feeding on the frozen mysids (Liisa Coit, pers. com.). The younger fry are quick to copy them, learning from their example.

    Okay, Patricia, that’s the quick rundown on rearing seahorses and eventually weaning them onto a diet of frozen Mysis. It can be tricky weaning the juveniles onto a staple diet of frozen Mysis, and you need to be prepared to make water changes and to be very diligent in cleaning up the breeder net and uneaten shaved Mysis while the youngsters are getting the hang of it. But once they are weaned onto frozen Mysis, the juveniles will grow rapidly and will be ready to introduced to the main tank within 2-3 months or less.

    Of course, I would be very happy to enroll you in the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Program, and you should find the lesson on rearing the young to be especially useful at this point, Patricia. I will go ahead and send you the entire Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Course – all 10 lessons together in one file – in PDF format as an attachment to this e-mail. You can then download the attachment, save it on your computer, and read through the 10 lessons at your leisure, taking all of the time you need to go over the information and absorb the material. As you do so, it will be your job to contact me via e-mail whenever you have any questions or concerns about the material in the lessons, and I will then do my very best to answer all of your questions and clarify everything for you.

    I will also be relying on you to keep me updated on any changes or additions you make to your aquarium system so that I can keep the information in my records regarding your particular seahorse setup current and accurate at all times. That will help me to provide you with the best possible guidance and assistance as you go over the lessons.

    When you are done with all 10 of the lessons, and feel you have had a chance to thoroughly absorb the information and master the lessons, send me a brief e-mail to that effect and I will be happy to put your certification through with Ocean Rider right away.

    Be sure to save the PDF file with the seahorse training lessons on your computer for future reference, Patricia. It includes a detailed table of contents with page numbers, so that you can quickly locate the material or section you would like to go back and review at any time.

    Just remember that the lessons are for your eyes only, Patricia, with the obvious exception of any immediate family members who may be helping you with the aquarium or the care of the seahorses. Please don’t share the PDF file with the complete training program or the individual lessons with any other hobbyists or individuals without first obtaining my expressed permission to do so. Thanks for your cooperation!

    Best wishes with all your fishes, Patricia! By the time you read this, you should already have your copy of the seahorse training manual waiting for you in your inbox.

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Training Program Advisor

    #5685
    DonS
    Guest

    Pete,

    I’d like to follow up from my earlier post about the status of the program and thank you for both your e-mail responses and the material. The program is very well done and worth requesting for those interested.

    I would have replied earlier, but we’ve had an unexpected loss in our family. I’m only now getting back.

    Thanks again,

    Don

     

    #5687
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear Don:

    I’m very sorry to hear about the loss in your family, sir, but I wanted to thank you for your kind words about the seahorse training program.

    The training manual really is very comprehensive, consisting of several hundred pages of text with more than 250 full color photographs, so even the most experienced hobbyists are bound to learn a few things that will be helpful to them in their pursuit of this hobby.

    I would also like to point out that the training manual is revised regularly. At least once a year – normally a few times annually – I revise the training manual to include additional information, new illustrations, and to update the material in the links in the text. So even if you have already completed the seahorse training program a long time ago, you might want to consider requesting a new copy of the training manual if it’s been more than a year since you went through the program.

    And, of course, newbies and first-time and time seahorse keepers will find the training program to be an invaluable aid. There is nowhere else you will find as much useful, pertinent information on the aquarium care and keeping of seahorses in one location. (The training manual puts all the other guide books on seahorses to shame, and is much more up-to-date than any of the print media on our amazing aquatic equines.)

    As always, the training manual is completely free of charge to all Ocean Rider clients and customers, so there is really no reason not to participate.

    Anyone who is interested should send me a brief reply by e-mail with a little background information about your experience level as an aquarist, if any, and I will take it from there. You can always reach me at the following e-mail address:

    [email protected]

    Best wishes with all your fishes, everyone!

    Respectfully,
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Training Program Advisor

    #5720
    danar
    Guest

    Please add me to list [email protected]

    #5721
    cmanh
    Guest
    Goodmorning Pete:
     
    I’m so happy I found seahorse.com.  I promised my daughter, who is 7 1/2, that on her 6th birthday she would have a seahorse aquarium.  I have read Seahorses, A Complete Pet Owner’s Manual and Saltwater Aquariums for Dummies several times and highlighted so many lines that they don’t seem to stand out anymore.  I have also found several websites, reading and comparing them with seemingly more contradictions than agreed upon facts. 
     
    I need more specifics and would like to begin the seahorse training program.  I have neither experience nor equipment.  I’m determined to do this and obviously need help.  I have the location in our home and as I’m handy, would like to build the corner unit for the aquarium to sit on top of.  I’m looking for an aquarium between 35-40 gallons to begin this hobby.  I’m guessing you will probably encourage a bigger one, but this size, as long as it can comfortably handle four seahorses, is a good start for us.  Before beginning the program I would like to order/get the aquarium so I can build the unit to hold it.  That said, could you please tell me, considering all the equipment that will be in/on/under/coming into/leaving out of/etc., what aquarium (brand, model, glass vs. acrylic, etc.) would you get that is 35-40 gallons in size?  If I can order this, I will feel more comfortable and confident moving forward and making progress with the training program and appropriate choices with the “gear” that we need which will work with the aquarium. 
     
    Thanks again.  I appreciate your guidance and look forward to working with you!
     
    Chris Hatzis
     
    #5722
    Pete Giwojna
    Guest

    Dear Christopher:

    Yes, sir, the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Program is definitely the reference you have been looking for to make sure you get started out on the right foot with your seahorse project, and I would be honored to help make your daughter’s dream of having a seahorse tank of her own a reality.

    Although the seahorse guides you will find in print can be helpful for a beginner, they are really quite limited since they cannot be easily updated and therefore quickly become outdated and less useful and relevant. You will find the training manual for the Ocean Rider seahorse training course, which is updated regularly, to be much more useful and informative.

    For one thing, Chris, it consists of several hundred pages of text with more than 250 full-color illustrations, making it far more comprehensive than any of the seahorse guidebooks you will ever find.

    Secondly, sir, it is based on Ocean Rider Mustangs and Sunbursts (Hippocampus erectus) exclusively and will provide you with the in-depth knowledge and training you and your daughter need in order to care for these amazing aquatic equines properly in your home. It will explain how to optimize an aquarium to provide ideal conditions for the Mustangs and Sunbursts, which are by far the best seahorses for beginners to keep. I will attach a file to this e-mail for you to download and save on your computer, Chris, so that you and your daughter can go through it at your leisure, which explains more about Mustangs and Sunbursts and why they are so well suited for first-time seahorse keepers.

    Best of all, it includes extensive photo galleries of Mustangs and Sunbursts respectively, including dozens and dozens of color photographs of each of these types, all taken by their proud owners in their home aquariums. That will give you an your daughter a really good idea of exactly what the Sunburst and Mustangs are like, and whether or not you would like to set up a seahorse tank that would be ideal for them. You and your daughter can look through this document together and perhaps get some inspiration and good ideas about what your own seahorse tank should be like when it’s up and running.

    An aquarium of 35-40 gallons would be a good choice for a project such as yours, Chris. The recommended stocking density for large tropical seahorses, such as Ocean Rider Mustangs and Sunbursts (Hippocampus erectus), is one pair per 10 gallons of water, with a minimum tank size of 30 gallons. In other words, an aquarium of 35-40 gallons with an efficient filtration system can easily accommodate several of the seahorses – perhaps two mated pairs, if you and your daughter would like the seahorses to breed – and still provide you with a comfortable margin for error as beginners. At the same time, it is not so large that it would be prohibitively expensive or take up too much room in your home to be a welcome addition to your decor.

    When it comes to finding a suitable aquarium, sir, I would be happy to suggest some good options for you in that regard that would be quite economical.

    For starters, I would suggest a tall 37-gallon all glass aquarium from Aqueon that would make an outstanding environment for two mated pairs of Mustangs or Sunbursts and that would also provide you and your daughter with a really comfortable margin for error as a first-time seahorse keeper, Chris.

    If you want to start out with a basic set up for keeping two pairs of Mustangs or Sunbursts, Chris, perhaps the most ideal aquarium system I could suggest would be to obtain an Aqueon 37-gallon Aquarium (Item # 10037, UPC Code 015905100373) with black trim (30.3″L x 12.5″W x 22.8″H), equip it with a simple, standard, off-the-shelf glass cover and an off-the-shelf strip reflector with an ordinary florescent daylight bulb, and then fit it with a suitable Aqueon hang-on-the-back external power filter, as described below.

    In short, Chris, the basic aquarium system that I would recommend in your case is an Aqueon 37-gallon Aquarium (Item # 10037, UPC Code 015905100373) with black trim (30.3″L x 12.5″W x 22.8″H) equipped with an Aqueon QuietFlow external filter, a simple glass aquarium cover such as the Versa-Top Hinged Glass Top by Aqueon, and an ordinary strip reflector with a fluorescent bulb, which we would then cycle using SeaChem Stability. That’s a very economical set up that can be very successful as a seahorse tank and that is easy to set up and pretty foolproof once it’s up and running.

    All that remains is to explain where you can obtain these items if they are not available from your local fish stores:

    1) One Aqueon 37-gallon Aquarium (Item # 10037, UPC Code 015905100373) with black trim (30.3″L x 12.5″W x 22.8″H).

    Any of your local fish stores will be able to order the 37-Gallon Aqueon Aquarium with black trim for you, Chris, for a price of about $80,

    2) One 30″ All-Glass Versa-Top Hinged Glass Top, which fits the Aqueon 37-gallon aquarium perfectly.

    The Aqueon or All-Glass Versa-Top Model 30″ will fit the Aqueon 37-gallon Aquarium perfectly, and if you cannot get one from your local fish stores, then you can order one online from Drs. Foster and Smith at the following website for cost of about $20, Chris. Just copy the following URL, paste it in your web browser, and press the “Enter” key, and it will take you to the right page to order the All-Glass Versa-Top Model 30″ (CD-930819):

    <<<<>>>>

    3) One 30″ length Aqueon Fluorescent Strip Light in Black with fluorescent bulb, which fits the Aqueon 37-gallon aquarium perfectly.

    If you cannot get in a Aqueon Fluorescent Strip Light in Black from one of your local fish stores, you can purchase a 30″ Aqueon Fluorescent Strip Light in Black that will fit your Aqueon 37-Gallon Aquarium perfectly from Petco for about $35, Chris. Just copy the following URL, paste it in your web browser, and press the “Enter” key, and it will take you to the right page on the Petco website where you can order a 30″ Aqueon Fluorescent Strip Light in Black online:

    <<<<>>>>

    4) One Aqueon QuietFlow Power Filter, Model 50, which is is rated for aquariums of up to 50 gallons and puts out 250 gallons per hour, which means it will turn over your 37-gallon aquarium about six times every hour – just right for a seahorse tank! The Aqueon QuietFlow Power Filter will provide additional water movement and extra filtration for your Aqueon 37-Gallon aquarium. It is an external, hang-on-the-back filter with a waterfall return that will provide the tank with mechanical, chemical, biological, and stationary wet/dry filtration, as well as good surface agitation and oxygenation.

    If you cannot find the Aqueon QuietFlow Power Filter Model 50 (CD-76962) at one of your local fish stores, Connor, you can purchase one online from Drs. Foster and Smith for cost of about $23. Just copy the following URL, paste it in your web browser, and press the “Enter” key, and it will take you to the right page on the Drs. Foster and Smith to order the Aqueon QuietFlow Power Filter Model 50 (CD-76962):

    <<<<>>>>

    Okay, Chris, that would be a very effective, yet economical aquarium system for you that could easily support two mated pairs of Mustangs or Sunbursts.

    I would suggest that you look over the information I provided above regarding a suitable aquarium and accessories for your seahorse project, and then download the attached document with the additional information and photo galleries on Mustangs and Sunbursts and go through that material with your daughter.

    If, after you have had a chance to go over the material on the Mustangs and Sunbursts, you and your daughter feel they would be a good choice for your seahorse project, and the aquarium equipment I have outlined above is within your allotted budget, please let me know and we can proceed from there.

    If you and your daughter do indeed decide to proceed with your seahorse project, I will then provide you with a copy of the training manual and we can begin the seahorse training course. All newbies and first-time and time customers are required to complete the Ocean Rider Seahorse Training Program to my satisfaction before they can be certified and authorized to order any seahorses, Chris, so that would be the logical next step towards achieving your goal.

    Best wishes with all your fishes, sir!

    Happy Trails!
    Pete Giwojna, Ocean Rider Tech Support

    #5750
    clownfish
    Guest

     

     

     

    Dear Pete

    MY name is Gary you sent me the Training Program on March 28 2012. It was sent to a old email i had [email protected] i am now ready to get seahorses from Ocean Riders. I have read the program more then 3 times I have done saltwater tank service for about 4 years now i have 4 tanks 300 gal Fish only and 3 reef 1 24 gal 1 60 gal and 150 gal 

    thank you Gary

     

     

     

    #5751
    clownfish
    Guest

     

     

     

    Dear Pete

    MY name is Gary you sent me the Training Program on March 28 2012. It was sent to a old email i had [email protected] i am now ready to get seahorses from Ocean Riders. I have read the program more then 3 times I have done saltwater tank service for about 4 years now i have 4 tanks 300 gal Fish only and 3 reef 1 24 gal 1 60 gal and 150 gal 

    thank you Gary

     

     

     

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